Working for Justice

Tag: Legislative Update

Recent Development: Kentucky Becomes 25th State to Protect Pregnant Employees at Work

Posted May 10th, 2019 by in Employment Discrimination.

If you live in Kentucky and are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding, you should be aware of new protections that may apply to you and your employer. Last month Kentucky passed the Pregnant Workers Act with bipartisan support, making it the 25th state to pass specific legislation to protect pregnant employees. Federal laws […]

Read More

HHS Proposes Rule That Subjects Rebate System to Anti-Kickback Liability

Posted February 19th, 2019 by in Whistleblower Law.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a proposal to amend the Anti-Kickback Statute to expressly exclude from safe harbor protections rebates on prescription drugs paid by manufacturers to pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), Part D plans, and Medicaid-managed care organizations.[1]  This proposal, if finalized, will alter the incentive structure for PBMs, benefiting consumers […]

Read More

Sexual Harassment Training: Mandatory in Several States and Critical Nationwide

Posted November 6th, 2018 by in Gender Discrimination and Harassment.

As of October 9, 2018, New York State employers are now required to provide sexual harassment training pursuant to the State’s recently enacted sexual harassment prevention legislation, Section 201-g of the New York State Labor Law. This new law requires that all employers within New York, both private and public, provide annual anti-harassment training to […]

Read More

Tipped Off: Recent Developments in Federal Wage Law Affecting Tipped Employees

Posted April 9th, 2018 by in Wages and Overtime Law.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) generally requires that employers pay employees at least $7.25 per hour. One of the few exceptions to the rule is “tipped employees” – including waiters, bartenders, and other employees who regularly receive gratuities for performing their jobs. The FLSA allows employers to subsidize the minimum wage paid to […]

Read More

Legislative Update: DC’s Universal Paid Leave Amendment Act of 2016

Posted March 12th, 2018 by in Employment Discrimination.

As part of the national trend to pass state and local laws guaranteeing private-sector workers paid leave for family and caregiving responsibilities, Washington D.C. is poised to join California, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Washington state in offering this benefit. And I’m not alone in saying: it’s about time. A study conducted by […]

Read More

New York City Fast Food and Retail Workers Look Forward to Fair Scheduling and Work Hours

Posted June 6th, 2017 by in Wages and Overtime Law.

New York City workers and employee advocates cheered as the city last week passed legislation designed to protect some of its most vulnerable workers.  After being approved by the City Council on May 24, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed the Fair Work Week legislative package into law on May 30, 2017, stating that “thousands of […]

Read More

New Laws Prohibit Employers from Asking Job Applicants about Their Salary Histories

Posted April 26th, 2017 by in Gender Discrimination and Harassment.

In the past year, lawmakers in Puerto Rico, Massachusetts, New York City, and Philadelphia have passed “salary history laws.” These new laws make it illegal for employers to ask job applicants about their current salaries or the salaries they earned at previous jobs. To put it simply, these laws take your salary history off the […]

Read More

Overtime Could Be in Jeopardy for 5 Million Workers

Posted February 24th, 2016 by in Wages and Overtime Law.

Bureaucracy is boring. “Regulatory Plans,” “Notice and Comment,” “Final Rules”—the Administrative State tends to glaze eyes. But for a moment last July, the media set its gaze on bureaucracy. That’s because a bureaucratic agency, the Department of Labor, proposed a rule that could increase the wages of millions of workers. Specifically, the DOL proposal makes […]

Read More

A Call to Action: DC Universal Paid Leave Act

The District of Columbia is on the brink of becoming the most generous place in the country to become new parents.  If the Universal Paid Leave Act of 2015 becomes law, DC workers will be entitled to 16 weeks of paid leave for the birth of a child or other qualifying family or medical event. […]

Read More

Religious Groups Support Same-Sex Marriage As a Lesbian Rabbi Shatters a Glass Ceiling

Posted March 31st, 2015 by in Employment Discrimination.

As the Supreme Court prepares to address the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans, the acceptance of gay marriage continues to blossom across the religious spectrum. Most notably, earlier this month the Presbyterian Church USA — the largest Presbyterian denomination in the U.S., with some 1.8 million members —adopted a definition of marriage that is more […]

Read More

Categories

Tags

Archives

Back to Top