Working for Justice

Tag: Caregiver Discrimination

Motherhood & The Gender Pay Gap

In May of this year, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission reached a $100,000 settlement agreement in a gender discrimination case against a Florida insurance broker. Why? The company revoked a woman’s job offer “20 minutes after she asked her would-be supervisor about its maternity policy.” Citing an “urgent” need to have someone in the […]

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Lessons on Women’s Economic Progress and Policies from the Fed Chair

Janet Yellen, Chair of the Federal Reserve and arguably the most powerful woman in the world, is best known for her role in U.S. monetary policy.  But in a recent speech, she tackled a totally different subject – women’s economic progress over the past century.  Her speech, So We All Can Succeed: 125 Years of […]

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The Motherhood Penalty a.k.a Caregiver or Family Responsibilities Discrimination

In a 2007 study, Cornell sociologists Correll, Benard, and Paik examined the motherhood penalty, a phrase sociologists use to describe the systemic disadvantages that working mothers often encounter in hiring, pay, promotion, and other aspects of their employment. In the United States, mothers suffer a per-child wage penalty of approximately 5%, controlling for similar qualifications […]

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“Caregiverism” Feminism: A Proposal for Converting Super Humans to Mere Mortals

As the product of a single-parent household, it is not as though I am unfamiliar with the concept of a woman who puts in long hours at work while serving as the primary breadwinner.  Nonetheless, I am in awe of working professional women who are mothers.  And when it comes to the subset of these […]

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Ensuring Caregivers’ Equal Access to Social Security

Posted February 16th, 2016 by in Gender Discrimination and Harassment.

Paid family leave has been at the fore of both the Sanders and Clinton campaigns. According to their campaign websites, both Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton support creating an entitlement to at least 12 weeks of paid family leave. While paid family leave would be a tremendous step forward, it […]

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How Do We Think About Children?

In a recent article published in The Atlantic, Sophie Gilbert, who is the Senior Editor for the magazine’s Culture section, reviewed a recently published collection of essays titled Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed, which relates the personal choices of sixteen individuals to not have children.  As Gilbert relates, the collection’s project is to “dismantle the assumption of […]

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Q&A with Laura Brown, Co-Founder of First Shift Justice Project

Posted October 30th, 2014 by in Gender Discrimination and Harassment.

As one of my colleagues wrote earlier this fall, a woman should not have to choose between having a job and having a baby.  Laura Brown agrees.  With Keira McNett, Laura founded First Shift Justice Project earlier this year to protect workers in their “first shift”—their paid employment—so they can work the “second shift”—providing unpaid […]

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On Non-traditional Career Arcs: A Thank You to Working Moms

Although gender and pregnancy discrimination cases are a central part of my legal practice, Pregnant Lawyers’ July 11, 2014 post “Lawyering While Pregnant” was an alarming reminder to me of how far removed my experiences as a male professional are from the experiences of my female colleagues and clients, particularly those who are going through […]

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