Working for Justice

Tag: 9th Circuit

After-Acquired Evidence and Self-Help Discovery: What Employees Need to Know

Posted April 28th, 2020 by in Employment Discrimination.

Evidence-gathering is one of the most critical parts of any employment discrimination lawsuit. In the normal course of litigation, wrongfully terminated employees may use discovery tools to obtain evidence to prove their case. However, sometimes—due to mistrust in an employer, lack of knowledge about the legal system, or uncertainty that they even want to file […]

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Prior Pay Cannot Be Used To Justify Paying Women Less In Ninth Circuit

“In 1963, Congress enacted the Equal Pay Act with a mandate as simple as it was profound: equal pay for equal work.” So begins the opinion in Rizo v. Yovino, a recent Ninth Circuit case holding that prior pay may not be used to justify a pay discrepancy between men and women—even if it is […]

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Can I Bring Qui Tam Claims in Court Even Though my Employment Contract Contained a Binding Arbitration Clause? The Ninth Circuit Says “Yes.”

Posted November 7th, 2017 by in Whistleblower Law.

When a private party brings an action under the False Claims Act, he or she sues not “only for himself but the king” in what is known as a qui tam law suit. The private plaintiff is called the relator. United States ex rel. Eisenstein v. City of New York, 556 U.S. 928, 932 (2009). […]

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Gender Discrimination? Because Makeup Doesn’t Grow on Trees

Before I go to work every morning, I engage in a ritual that my husband has never needed to.  As the New York Times reports, this ritual is can make women appear confident, capable, reliable, or likable in the workplace, and can even lead to a higher salary when compared to other women.  What is […]

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