Working for Justice

Race Discrimination

Antidiscrimination Laws Can Help Combat Racial and Ethnic Discrimination in Medicine

Posted August 9th, 2018 by in Race Discrimination.

A few months ago, I blogged about the considerable evidence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment in the medical profession. Here, I turn to the persistent racial and ethnic disparities among physicians. Like gender disparities, racial and ethnic disparities in medicine manifest in multiple forms—in pay, promotions, and harassment from colleagues and patients. A growing […]

Read More

Race Discrimination at Work: Title VII Should Cover Bias Against Dreadlocks

Posted April 9th, 2018 by in Race Discrimination.

“We need not leave our common sense at the doorstep when we interpret a statute,” wrote a four-Justice plurality of the Supreme Court in Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, 490 U.S. 228, 241 (1989), the seminal ruling that gender stereotyping by an employer is actionable as sex discrimination under Title VII. And yet, nearly three decades […]

Read More

42 U.S.C. § 1981: A Recipe for Race Relations and Reconciliation in the Wake of Charlottesville?

Posted February 14th, 2018 by in Race Discrimination.

Congress initially enacted the protections of 42 U.S.C. § 1981 as part of the Civil Rights Act of 1866, in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The act was passed between the ratification of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. In relevant part, the current act provides: (a) Statement of equal […]

Read More

Study Shows Implicit Bias against African-American Attorneys at Law Firms

Posted July 26th, 2017 by in Race Discrimination.

Ever feel like you’ve received extra scrutiny because of your race?  Research suggests that these fears may be well founded.  A recent study indicates that supervisors are far more likely to overlook or forgive the mistakes of white employees – while African-American employees are far more likely to have their mistakes caught, criticized, and used […]

Read More

Supreme Court Update:  Justices Send Racially “Packed” Voting Districts Packing

Posted May 24th, 2017 by in Race Discrimination.

The Supreme Court handed a major victory to voting rights plaintiffs on May 22, with a decision that struck down the boundaries of two congressional districts in North Carolina as impermissibly effecting race discrimination.  Cooper v. Harris, with a majority decision written by Justice Kagan, takes aim at the practice of diluting the power of […]

Read More

Supreme Court Rules Cities Can Sue Banks Over Racially Discriminatory Lending Practices

Posted May 19th, 2017 by in Race Discrimination.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Bank of America v. City of Miami (decided the same day as a companion case, Wells Fargo & Co. et al. v. City of Miami, Florida) has been declared a mixed bag by many legal commentators. While the Court confirmed years of precedence in finding that cities, like […]

Read More

People with Criminal Records “Need Not Apply”: Criminal Background Checks and Race Discrimination

Posted April 7th, 2017 by in Race Discrimination.

More than 90% of employers rely on criminal background checks to make hiring decisions, but this common practice raises numerous concerns.  First, there are practical issues about whether background checks actually provide employers with meaningful information.  For example, recent research indicates that after a certain amount of time, individuals who have committed a crime are […]

Read More

“Master of None” and the freedom to be average

Posted November 17th, 2015 by in Race Discrimination.

Racial disparities on television are nothing new. When I was a child in the late 1980s, I remember having an internal struggle about whether my career of choice would be professional athlete or superhero. I also remember coming to the conclusion that because no superheroes had brown skin, that professional athlete would be the more […]

Read More

Beyond Seventy-Eight Percent

Posted April 7th, 2015 by in Race Discrimination.

Sometimes lost in the discussion about the wage gap between male and female workers is the role of race. Though white women earn a mere 78% of what their male counterparts earn in America, the gap is far greater for women of color. African American women earn 64%, American Indian women earn 59%, Native Hawaiian […]

Read More

Honoring Hong Yen Chang: A Pioneer for a More Inclusive Legal Profession

Posted April 1st, 2015 by in Race Discrimination.

Recently, the California Supreme Court posthumously granted Hong Yen Chang admission to the California Bar – reversing a 125-year-old decision that denied his application because of his race and national origin. (Read the Court’s decision here; read more about the case here, here, and here.) Chang was born in China and immigrated to the United […]

Read More

Categories

Tags

Archives

Back to Top